Cricket Spread Betting Tips

Spread Betting Companies

Spread Betting provides a slightly different method for betting on cricket, and offers punters with a hunch – that a player might prosper or struggle – a great way of making money.

If you are successful at Spread Betting, it can be very rewarding. Get it badly wrong, and it can seriously punish you. The most established Spread Betting company in the market place today is Sporting Index, you can open an account with them here and claim a £100.00 Welcome Bonus in the process.

How Spread Betting Works

With Spread Betting, you basically Buy or Sell. For example, Alastair Cooks 5 Test match Ashes total runs spread is Sell 390 – Buy 410.

What this means is if you think Alastair Cook will score under 390 runs, you would sell his series runs. If you sell Cook’s runs at £1.00 a run and he score 300 runs, you would win £90.00 (90 X £1.00). Alternatively, if Cook scores 450 runs, you would lose £60.00 (60 x £1.00). More examples can be found on our Cricket Spread Betting Explained page.

Ashes Spread Betting Tips

Mitchell Johnson’s wicket spread betting index for the 2015 Ashes series in England is Sell at 240 – Buy at 250. The way the spread works, sees Johnson get 10 points awarded for every wicket taken, with a 25 point bonus awarded for every 5 wicket haul (so if Johnson takes 5 wickets in an innings, he would get 75 points).

In the 2013/14 Ashes series down under, Johnson had an unbelievable series, taking 37 wickets, with three 5 wicket hauls. That would have netted him an extraordinary 445 points, totally smashing the spread.

Behind Johnson in the stats, came Ryan Harris with 22 wickets and one 5 wicket haul, resulting in 245 spread betting points. Then it was Stuart Broad with 21 wickets, and one 5 wicket haul, which would have seen him reach 235 points.

I would suggest the points totals of Ryan Harris and Stuart Broad are the more realistic figures in any 5 match series. I would totally discard Johnson’s 37 wicket haul as a one off freak show. It was an extraordinary achievement, but what are the chances of it happening again?

Personally, I think the best Mitchell Johnson will achieve is his spread, and I would be quite prepared to Sell Mitchell Johnson’s Ashes betting Spread of 240 points.

Please note, if Johnson misses a Test match, 51 points will be awarded for every Test he misses. So please don’t be under the impression that you can win money by Johnson not playing.

Back in the 2013 Ashes series in England, Graeme Swann took 26 wickets with two 5 wicket hauls, giving him 310 points. Swann was a top quality spinner playing on pitches prepared for him. After Swann (back in 2013) came Ryan Harris, he took 24 wickets in 4 Test matches with two 5 wicket hauls, that would have won him 341 points (he would have got an extra 51 for missing one Test match), actually putting him above Swann.

Stuart Broad and Jimmy Anderson both scored 270 points in 2013, which would be slightly above Johnson’s spread, but it shows that English style bowlers (obviously) prosper in English style conditions, which would surely make Josh Hazelwood a better bet if you are looking to buy points.

Josh Hazelwood’s spread points are Sell at 225 – Buy at 235. Personally I would expect Hazelwood to pick up 20 wickets quite comfortably in this series, and just one 5 wicket haul (along with 20 wickets) would put him above his Buy spread of 235.

If Hazelwood is too have an outstanding Ashes series, he could smash 235 points, and make over 300 points. Ryan Harris showed in 2013 what a good old fashioned English style line and length bowler can do, and Hazelwood has all those tools and a lot more.

Personally, I see Josh Hazelwood as a better wicket taking option in this Ashes series than Mitchell Johnson. So therefore my Ashes spread betting tips would be to Sell Mitchell Johnson’s Bowling Index at 240, and to Buy Josh Hazelwood’s Bowling Index at 235 points – both prices with Sporting Index.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS